Satellite Wi-Fi will take the Internet to disconnected Mexicans

Satellite Wi-Fi will take the Internet to disconnected Mexicans

Apr 22, 2018

In Mexico there are 63.9 million Mexicans with Internet access, which means that 56.1 million of the 120 million inhabitants in the country don’t have access to the network. Although the Red Compartida will provide connectivity to 92.2% of the population by 2024, around 7.8% of the inhabitants will still lack the service. However, the satellite company ViaSat seeks to offer mobile telephone and internet connection to approximately 6 million Mexicans living in areas where there is no connectivity. “The strategy is to deploy antennas in communities where there is no internet to connect to their satellite ViaSat 2 and provide Wi-Fi to the area”, explained Kevin Cohen, general manager of Consumer Broadband for Latin America of the company. “The idea is to close the digital gap, and reach the disconnected population. We know that in Mexico there are communities with poor 2G or 3G service, and we want to change that,” he said. “To provide this coverage, we launched ViaSat 2 in June 2017, which has more than 280 Gbps and offers licensed service in the United States, and now we are looking to deploy other types of services for consumers with lower purchasing power”, he continued. “This satellite provides service over Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean and that is why we can enter Mexico with this coverage,” he explained. “We ran tests in 550 communities around Monterrey and saw that there was a market and a way to provide mobile phone service with our technology,” he said. In addition to Monterrey, we have coverage in Baja California, Chihuahua, Sonora, Coahuila, Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Zacatecas and San Luis Potosí. We are already covering about 200,000 Mexicans who did not have internet in their community,” he said. On April 2018, ViaSat will begin the deployment of its Wi-Fi service in the country. In Mexico there are only three satellites operating in the orbits 113W, 114.8W and 116W degrees, which represents 0.3% both in records and in satellite possession on a global scale, according to figures from The Competitive Intelligence Unit (CIU). While the United States has 41.5% of satellite possession and 28.2% of records per satellite country. Brazil and Argentina surpass Mexico, with...

Assisted reproduction: number 3 reason for Health Tourism in Mexico

Assisted reproduction: number 3 reason for Health Tourism in Mexico

Apr 18, 2018

Infertility treatments are between 30% to 50% less expensive in Mexico than in other countries, such as the United States, which has boosted medical tourism in the country. According to Abraham Martínez, general director of INVINSEMER in Mexico City, assisted reproductive treatments are the third reason behind this type of tourism, after cardiovascular procedures and plastic surgery, pursuant to a study by ProMexico and the Ministry of Health. Depending on the technique used, the prices for these treatments may range from MXN$ 18,000 for an artificial insemination procedure – with an effectiveness percentage ranging from 15% to 20% – to almost MXN$ 120,000 for an egg donation procedure – with a success of 80 per cent. In our country, there are 2.6 million infertility cases and every year 180,000 more are diagnosed, according to figures of the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI). The director of the fertility clinic mentioned that the current lifestyle or age at which couples decide to become parents, among other factors, are conditions which may complicate conceiving a child. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), infertility is defined as the unsuccessful attempts of a couple to conceive over the course of a full year, a situation which already affects 17% of the Mexican couples, according to Ipsos Healthcare. There are several causes of infertility, such as hormone imbalances, conditions such as endometriosis, ovulation problems, untreated infections such as chlamydia or gonorrhea, low sperm count and sperm motility, and abnormal sperm morphology. He added that a high percentage of infertile couples are able to conceive with the adequate treatment, therefore, it is vital that a reproduction expert determines whether the reproductive problem is present in one or both partners, and which steps to follow afterward....

Pint of Science: A global science festival comes to Mexicali

Pint of Science: A global science festival comes to Mexicali

Apr 16, 2018

The Pint of Science festival aims to deliver interesting and relevant talks on the latest science research in an accessible format to the public – mainly across bars and pubs. We want to provide a platform which allows people to discuss research with the people who carry it out and no prior knowledge of the subject is required. It is run mainly by volunteers and was established by a community of postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers in 2012. Pint of Science aims to include all areas of research. Events are divided into the following six themes: Beautiful Mind – neuroscience, psychiatry and psychology; Atoms to Galaxies – physics, chemistry, maths; Our Body – human biology, health, and medicine; Planet Earth – earth sciences, zoology, plant science; Tech Me Out – technology, engineering, and computing; and Our Society – sociology, law, history, policy. Typically, a group of three to ten organizers take on representing and showcasing one of these themes. The event organizers are responsible for finding a single venue for the three evenings of the festival and for planning and running three separate events related to their chosen theme....

SpaceX aced its launch, but the $6 million nose cone crashes near Baja California

SpaceX aced its launch, but the $6 million nose cone crashes near Baja California

Mar 30, 2018

SpaceX launched another rocket on Friday March 30, and fans waited with bated breath to find out that the company was not successful on landing the $6 million nose cone into a giant seaborne net. So news were not good. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter that as the nose cone — also called a fairing — fell back toward Earth, the parafoils that were supposed to slow its decent became tangled.  So the “fairing impacted water at high speed,” Musk said. That likely destroyed it. Liftoff occurred just after 7 am PT from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and the primary mission went off without a hitch. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket delivered a group of 10 satellites into orbit for communications firm Iridium (IRDM). SpaceX is well known for landing and reusing rocket boosters to bring down the price of its rockets. But this was one of the rare occasions Musk has acknowledged his rocket startup’s attempts to recover the fairing after launch.   The fairing rests on the top of the rocket, and it acts as a shield for the satellites during launch. Once the rocket is in space,it splits into two and falls away. Typically, it’s left to plummet back to Earth where the ocean becomes its graveyard. But SpaceX wants to change that. As Musk once put it, if “you had $6 million in cash on a palette flying through the air, and it’s going to smash into the ocean, would you try to recover it? Yes. Yes, you would.” The company has quietly tried to recapture the 43-foot-long fairing halves since at least March of 2017. At least twice, SpaceX guided fairing halves to soft landings in the ocean. But there’s a problem. “Once it gets into the water, it’s quite damaging to the electronics and components inside the fairing,” said Glenn Lightsey, a professor of aerospace engineering at Georgia Tech. “Most likely if it gets into the water, it’s not usable.”   Click here for full article on...

INNOBOTICS a “Cachanilla” Robotics team wins third place at national competition

INNOBOTICS a “Cachanilla” Robotics team wins third place at national competition

Mar 7, 2018

Students of the Cbtis 21 y 16 de Septiembre high schools in Mexicali, had an outstanding participation during the first national Robotics competition. The name of the Cachanilla team is “INNOBOTICS”. In addition to obtaining the third place among teams from all over the country with their robot prototype called ‘Lucy’, they distinguished themselves by their leadership, team camaraderie and values, becoming worthy of the “Gracious Professionalism 2018” special prize. 36 students and eight advisory teachers traveled to Monterrey, Nuevo León, the first days of March, to represent the city of Mexicali in this national contest. Their robot, manufactured to handle boxes using a claw similar to a forklift, faced a number of challenges during the competition, placing itself among the top three finalists. The preparation prior to the robotics competition lasted six weeks, during which the team members shared technical and administrative tasks, as well as the operation of the prototype. Besides, it was necessary to plan the fundraising and logistics of the trip too. Due to communication problems in the system, generated by the difficulty of transporting the device, during key moments the robot presented slight failures, placing them on third place. However, “we never gave up,” said members Omar Castillo and Enrique Germán. The students of sixth semester of the federal high school in Mexicali, pointed out that regardless of the achievements, the experience of competing at this level leaves a great personal benefit to those who participate. TBP Newsroom...

Nokia and Vodafone will bring 4G to the Moon

Nokia and Vodafone will bring 4G to the Moon

Feb 28, 2018

German new-space firm PTScientists has been planning a mission to the Moon for many years now. It has partnered with Audi to produce and deliver two XPrize-winning quattro rovers to the Moon that will explore both the lunar surface and carefully return to the Apollo 17 landing site in 2019. Now the team has partnered with Vodafone and Nokia to create a Moon-based communications network using 4G LTE to bring high-def video of the moon to those of us here on Earth. Vodafone’s base station will communicate with the rovers as they gather images and video of the various lunar sights. The 4G network will use the 1800 MHz frequency band to send HD video to the Autonomous Landing and Navigation Module (ALINA), which will then connect to PTScientists in Berlin. Nokia is making space-grade networking gear that will weigh less than one kilogram in total. 4G is more energy efficient than analog radio, and will allow a larger amount of data to be transferred between the rovers and the ALINA station. “We are very pleased to have been selected by Vodafone to be their technology partner,” said Nokia’s Marcus Weldon. “This important mission is supporting, among other things, the development of new space-grade technologies for future data networking, processing and storage, and will help advance the communications infrastructure required for academics, industry and educational institutions in conducting lunar research. These aims have potentially wide-ranging implications for many stakeholders and humanity as a whole, and we look forward to working closely with Vodafone and the other partners in the coming months, prior to the launch in 2019.”...